MARK D. FREEMAN, ESQUIRE

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Be sure that your wishes are carried out

after you have departed this life.small logo

YOU SHOULD HAVE AN ESTATE PLAN

If you are among the millions of Americans who hasn’t found the time to get your will done or plan your estate, don’t worry, your government will do it for you through the laws of intestacy.   For most Americans, an estate plan consists of a standard will, power of attorney and living will.  The primary objective of your estate plan is for you to identify who gets your assets when you die, who will administer your estate, who will take care of your affairs if you become incapacitated and can’t while you are still living and what kinds of end of life medical decisions would you like to make before you can’t make them.   Your estate plan may reduce death taxes where possible and, if you have young children, your estate plan should nominate a guardian for them in case they are left parentless.  If you have thought a living trust would be helpful, read what the attorney general of Pennsylvania says before you get one.

Click here for more information on living or revocable trusts.    

Click here for more information about probate.

To get started on your estate plan click here for our questionaire.

HAVE YOU BEEN APPOINTED AS EXECUTOR OF AN ESTATE?

If the will of a loved one names you as executor or administrator of an estate, you have (or will) swear an oath that you will follow the law as you administer the estate.  As the personal representative of an estate, any missteps you make in the administration of the estate could expose you to personal liability.  When we represent you as the personal representative of the estate, it is our job to ensure that you do not become personally liable to any creditors, government taxing agencies (like the IRS or the State) or to any beneficiary of the estate.  At all times, you retain control of the estate while we prepare the legal documents, inheritance and other death tax returns, court filings and the final estate accounting. 

Click here to learn more about estate administration.  

Click here to get started on estate administration.   

CREATE A LEGACY

Do you want to leave a legacy after you have departed this life?  Many clients want to do more than leave their estate to their family.  Some clients feel the need to create a lasting legacy by leaving some portion of their estate to their church or another charity.  Read about some legendary legacies that might inspire you to leave one of your own, even if your estate is a little more modest than these legends. 

Click here for Legendary Legacies.

Click here to get started on your own estate plan.

WHAT IF THERE IS NO WILL - THE LAW OF INTESTACY

When a person passes away without leaving a will the person is said to have died intestate. It means the deceased did not make a last will and testament. In cases of intestacy, the law provides who the beneficiaries of the estate will be. Who inherits the estate under the laws of intestacy depends on the family situation of the person who died. If a person has a surviving spouse or living children or living parents the law of intestacy generally makes these close relatives the beneficiaries. Where there is no living spouse or other living descendants, the law of intestacy will make more distant relatives the beneficairies of the estate. If you have a loved one who has passed on without a will and you are not sure of what to do you can call our office and set up an appointment with Mr. Freeman.

Click here if you would like to contact our office to set up an appointment with Mr. Freeman.

It is helpful for you to fill out an estate administration questionaire to the best of your ability prior to meeting with Mr. Freeman. Click Here for our estate administration questionaire.

For more information about the laws of intestacy, Click Here.

 

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The purpose of this site is to provide useful information about wills, estate planning and estate administration. It is not intended to provide legal advice.You should consult a competent estate planning and/or estate administration attorney before acting on any of the information contained on this site.